Hope in Dark Times

Sometimes the negative forces in our world seem so powerful they overwhelm our ability to see hope.  The promise of a peaceful, humane future seems unlikely.  Some think technology will lift us out of our despair and save us from our troubles, when technology is the problem, polluting and destroying nature and removing us further from our true nature, our souls.

That’s when it’s good to remember that truth and nature are stronger than human hubris and the forces of destruction.

Also good to remember is that truth resides within us, and as it courses through our true selves, it comforts and guides us, even through the darkest time.

When we are quiet, far from the noise and clamor of a troubled world, nature speaks to us in the silence … of its wonders.

In silence, in the darkest time, hope is born.

The Curse of Trauma–the Cure of Truth

It is not just victims of war, sexual abuse and other brutality who carry trauma—we all do.   We are all traumatized due to childhood misfortune and collective ancestral insanity.

Through my observations of my own inner world, of the people I work with as a therapist and my observations of the troubled global community, I realize that our species carries a tragic legacy of trauma. From the mists of time, when our human species first emerged, until now, we have misused our capacity of consciousness to become clever, brutal, overpopulating animals and not self-aware stewards of life.  This misuse of mind has wounded us, traumatized us.

We have blamed our destructive ways on our flawed human nature, the evil Other, or even on original sin.  But this is not true.  Trauma is the culprit that distorts our perception of reality.  Our essential human nature is good.  As we grieve and heal our traumatic past, we begin to know that our essence is true and our greatest hope.

When we heal our traumatic history, our true self begins to interface with truth.  With truth as our guide, we can do the real work of life which is to evolve consciousness to the next level of understanding.  When we experience this true purpose, we experience an abiding faith in the goodness of life and our role in it.  No matter the cruelty and confusion of the world around us, our life takes on a new meaning that inspires hope in ourselves and others for a new future.

What Is Your Passion?

I often ask others, “What is your passion?  What makes you tick?  What are you living for in the deepest sense?  What inspires you to go forward?”  Secretly, I’m hoping to discover my own passion, purpose and reason for being.

So I mused on this quietly for a while and this is what came to me.

My passion, my deepest purpose, my reason for being is to grow, to evolve, to become more conscious.  Ultimately I want to become at one with life and its mystery.

But at times, this passionate purpose can seem hard to define and hard to measure.

In the past, my passion and purpose were more quantifiable.  I wanted a love partner and success in my career.  I wanted to work and support myself in a meaningful and abundant way.  I wanted my parents to see me and love me at last.  Some of these goals I accomplished.  Some were impossible.  But win or lose, these were tangible goals.  But now I realize that they were secondary to my primary goal.

Now I see that underneath and running through all life goals, with their victories and defeats, was a deeper quest.  My passion was to tap into the river of meaning that flows through all of reality and through each age-appropriate quest in life.

The quest to become consonant with life’s meaning is my primary passion and always was, even with other secondary, more concrete goals.

Now I see what my passion is:  to answer the questions of life and solve the mystery of existence through my living and doing.  My passion is to become fully conscious and consonant with truth.  Other goals, though necessary in our lives, are secondary to this primary purpose.  Now this perspective guides my daily living, loving and doing.

I’m grateful to have solved this riddle of existence which represents a mutation in self-understanding.  As I strive to become consonant with truth, my daily living becomes sacred.

Who Do We Belong To?

We belong to ourselves.  We must remember if we are to be real and true, we belong to ourselves, to nature and to truth—not the limits of our upbringing.

Despite the common thinking of the world that argues we belong to our parents, our families, our culture and its values and traditions, this is not true.  We do not belong to limited people or systems that would confine our growth and damage our spirit.  We belong to ourselves and to universal principle and must leave the limits of our upbringing to live true.

But there is a struggle.

There is great pressure from our families and the conventional world to stay behind and honor mother and father and their world no matter how limited, dysfunctional or cruel and it takes an unusually gifted soul to leave it.  We were born into this world and our departure has a heartbreaking aspect to it since it is hard to see the failures of our first loves, mother and father and face the limits of our culture of origin.

Those who did not have the courage to leave will always resent those who do.  In fact those who stay behind will work hard to shame, guilt, withhold love and even shun those who escape the snares of a closed, cultist family system.  This is a sad and cruel manipulation.  Those who stay behind see those who leave as a threatening reminder of what they failed to do—become themselves, true people.  The free spirit of those who left reveals the closed prison of those who took the easier path of conformity and stayed behind.

But the troubling manipulations of the family to return to their world do not work.  Those who have tasted freedom and belong to life and its mystery do not return to the prison of safety and convention.  Rather these free spirits soar to higher realms of consciousness and wonder, unknown to the average.

Who Do We Belong to?

We belong to ourselves.  We must remember this if we are to be real and true—we belong to ourselves, to nature and to truth, not the limits of our upbringing.

Despite the common thinking of the world that argues we belong to our parents, our families, our culture and their values and traditions, this is not true.  We do not belong to limited people or systems that would confine our growth and damage our spirit.

We belong to ourselves and to universal principle and must leave the limits of our upbringing to live true.  But there is a struggle.

There is great pressure from our families and conventional thinking to stay behind and honor mother and father and their world no matter how limited, dysfunctional or cruel and it takes an unusually gifted soul to leave.  We were born into this world of our parents and our departure has a heartbreaking aspect to it, since it is hard to see the failures of our first loves, mother and father, and face the limits of our culture of origin.

Those who didn’t have the courage to leave will always resent those who did.    In fact those who stay behind will work hard to shame, guilt, withhold love and even shun those who escape the snares of a closed, cultist family system.  This is a sad and cruel manipulation.  Those who stay behind see those who leave as a threatening reminder of what they failed to do—become themselves, true people.  The free spirit of those who left reveals the closed prison of those who took the easier path of conformity and stayed behind.

But the troubling manipulations of the family to return to their world do not work.  Those who have tasted freedom and belong to life and its mystery do not return to the prison of safety and convention.  Rather these free spirits soar to higher realms of consciousness and wonder, unknown to the average.

Don’t Try So Hard — Just Be

Answers will come, even to our most perplexing questions and frightening dilemmas, when we can get quiet enough to listen.

When I quiet down, when I settle into the depths of my being, when I stop trying to change the world to work for me and just become still and fully and truly me, then I can hear myself, hear truth, hear the rhythms of the universe of which I am a part.  In this quiet, the answers are revealed.

Out of this depth, I trust the flow of life and trust the path I’m on.  Even if adjustments are necessary and a new direction is revealed, I see that I am already on the right path in the deepest part of me just by asking my questions in silence.  I need to be still in order to recognize the subtle voice of truth.

I can only find the depth of my purpose when I stop pushing and scrambling for answers in the outer.  Then the flow of life and its intention for me will come through.  When quiet is achieved and the answers given, then I can turn to the outer world to find the resources needed to match my inner and deepest intention.  There is always a way when the answers are real.

There is a paradox however.  I must consciously do something to not try so hard.  To be still can take great effort ironically.  I must stop my anxious pushing and trust life enough to quiet down.  Stillness, in the presence of the world’s frightened and at times frightening cries for attention, takes great courage.  Stillness in the presence of life’s deceptive cures and distracting enticements takes great trust.  But being quiet in the presence of the troubled noise of the outer allows a place within me to ring true.  Then I can express myself in the world with great power and moral authority for the energy coming through me is not from reactive fear but from proactive universal principle.

When I have settled into the depths of myself, then nature, truth and love flow through the receptive medium of me and a new way opens.  I receive the guidance and answers that eluded me in the noise of the world.  Now I ring clear as a bell from the crystalline sanctity of the quiet and power that resides in the depth of me.